Our Main Focus

Addiction Services:

Treating Opioid Dependance with Suboxone/Buprenorphine

In 2002, the FDA approved the use of the unique opioid buprenorphine (Subutex, Suboxone) for the treatment of opioid addiction in the U.S. Buprenorphine has numerous advantages over methadone and naltrexone. As a medication-assisted treatment, it suppresses withdrawal symptoms and cravings for opioids, does not cause euphoria in the opioid-dependent patient, and it blocks the effects of the other (problem) opioids for at least 24 hours.

How Does it Work?

There are two medications combined in each dose of Suboxone. The most important ingredient is buprenorphine, which is classified as a ‘partial opioid agonist,’ and the second is naloxone which is an ‘opioid antagonist’ or an opioid blocker.

What is a ‘Partial Opioid Agonist’?

A ‘partial opioid agonist’ such as buprenorphine is an opioid that produces less of an effect than a full opioid when it attaches to an opioid receptor in the brain. Oxycodone, hydrocodone, morphine, heroin and Methadone are examples of ‘full opioid agonists.

People who are opioid dependent do not get a euphoric effect or feel high when they take buprenorphine properly. Buprenorphine tricks the brain into thinking that a full opioid like oxycodone or heroin is in the lock, and this suppresses the withdrawal symptoms and cravings associated with that problem opioid.

Buprenorphine is a long-acting form of medicated-assisted treatment, meaning that it gets ‘stuck’ in the brain’s opiate receptors for about 24 hours. When buprenorphine is stuck in the receptor, the problem ‘full opioids’ can’t get in. This gives the person with opioid addiction a 24-hour reprieve each time a dose of Suboxone is taken. If a full opioid is taken within 24 hours of Suboxone, then the patient will quickly discover that the full opioid is not working – they will not get high and will not get pain relief (if pain was the reason it was taken). This 24-hour reprieve gives the patient time to reconsider the wisdom of relapsing with a problem opioid while undergoing medication-assisted treatment.

 

TMS Treatment for Depression

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation or TMS is a non-invasive, FDA cleared, treatment for patients with depression. Depression is a serious illness that affects approximately 350 million people worldwide. While medications may help manage symptoms, many patients are not satisfied with the results they get from standard drug therapy. TMS brings hope of remission to patients suffering from depression.

Patients who have not benefited from prior antidepressant medications or patients that wish to be free from side effects often associated with antidepressant medications. TMS treatment for depression is a safe, effective, non-invasive therapy that is performed in the comfort of our office.

Pain Management Services